• b-facebook
  • Twitter Round

 Plumbing Help and info.

Step 1: Locate The Main Water Shut-Off Valve

The first step is shutting off the main water valve is to locate it. In colder climates, you can usually find the main water shut-off valve in the basement or inside a closet in a front room of the house. Sometimes, builders will hide it behind a removable panel. In southern states, the main water shut-off valve is often located outside the house, usually along the front outside wall and often near an outside hose bib (faucet). In the small Texas town where I grew up, the main water shut-off valves were inside the meter box near the curb. If that’s the case where you live, make sure you have a meter box key so you can get into the meter vault if you have to. Some shut-off valves inside meter vaults even require a special “key” or wrench to turn them off but most can be turned off with a crescent wrench. Fortunately, most shut-off valves inside the house just require a firm grip of the hand to turn off.

Step 2: Turn Off The Water To Your House

Remember, turn the valve to the right to turn it off. It's simple as that.

Step 3: Have a Plan!

Not only should YOU know how to turn off the main water shut-off valve, you should make sure that every member of the family knows where to locate the shut-off valve and how to use it. This includes young children who may be home alone someday when catastrophe strikes. Additionally, it’s a good idea to put the plumber’s name and phone number near the shut-off valve. Tape his business card to the wall or place a tag on the valve. You may need to reach a plumber quickly if plumbing repairs are required. There are many scenarios where this could prove helpful. For instance, let’s say you've gone on vacation and your in-laws are house sitting when the water heater rusts out and starts flooding the floor. Water damage is not the first thing you want to see when you return home. You'll want that water turned off ASAP. To help you learn how to locate and turn off your water supply valve, 

How to Turn Off the Main Water Shut-Off Valve

Step 4: Contact Total Care Plumbing

Contact Total Care Plumbing for all plumbing needs and questions. 

Local Plumbing Codes and Permits

WHAT’S A BUILDING PERMIT?

A building permit gives you legal permission to start construction of a building project in accordance with approved drawings and specifications. WHEN DO YOU NEED A PERMIT? The best way to fi nd out if you need a permit is to call your local building department. Discuss your plans with the code official before beginning construction to determine whether you need a permit. Even if a permit is not needed, the code official will answer construction questions and may provide valuable advice. PERMITS ARE USUALLY REQUIRED FOR THE FOLLOWING: • N ew buildings • Additions (bedrooms, bathrooms, family rooms, etc.) • Residential work (decks, garages, fences, fi replaces, pools, water heaters, etc.) • Renovations (garage conversions, basement furnishings, kitchen expansions, reroofing, etc.) • Electrical systems • Plumbing systems • H  VAC (heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning) systems
Your home or business is an investment. If your construction project does not comply with the codes adopted by your community, the value of your investment could be reduced. Property insurers may not cover work done without permits and inspections. If you decide to sell a home or building that has had modifications without a permit, you may be required to tear down the addition, leave it unoccupied, or make costly repairs. A property owner who can show that code requirements were strictly and consistently met––as demonstrated by a code official’s carefully maintained records––has a strong ally if something happens to trigger a potentially destructive lawsuit. Your permit also allows the code official to protect the public by reducing the potential hazards of unsafe construction and ensuring public health, safety, and welfare. By following code guidelines, the completed project will meet minimum standards of safety and will be less likely to cause injury to you, your family, your friends, or future owners.The purpose behind building codes is to give reasonable assurance that a home is safe from structural failure, fire hazards from electrical and heating systems, electrical shock, and health risks. The permits provide a permanent record of the work performed and inspections conducted on the project. A BUILDING PERMIT? A building permit gives you legal permission to start construction of a building project in accordance with approved drawings and specifications. WHEN DO YOU NEED A PERMIT? The best way to fi nd out if you need a permit is to call your local building department. Discuss your plans with the code official before beginning construction to determine whether you need a permit. Even if a permit is not needed, the code official will answer construction questions and may provide valuable advice. PERMITS ARE USUALLY REQUIRED FOR THE FOLLOWING: • N ew buildings • A additions (bedrooms, bathrooms, family rooms, etc.) •  Residential work (decks, garages, fences, fi replaces, pools, water heaters, etc.) • Renovations (garage conversions, basement furnishings, kitchen expansions, reroofing, etc.) • Electrical systems • Plumbing• H  VAC (heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning) systems
Your home or business is an investment. If your construction project does not comply with the codes adopted by your community, the value of your investment could be reduced. Property insurers may not cover work done without permits and inspections. If you decide to sell a home or building that has had modifications without a permit, you may be required to tear down the addition, leave it unoccupied, or make costly repairs. A property owner who can show that code requirements were strictly and consistently met––as demonstrated by a code official’s carefully maintained records––has a strong ally if something happens to trigger a potentially destructive lawsuit. Your permit also allows the code official to protect the public by reducing the potential hazards of unsafe construction and ensuring public health, safety, and welfare. By following code guidelines, the completed project will meet minimum standards of safety and will be less likely to cause injury to you, your family, your friends, or future owners.